Monday, May 25, 2020

Extra Pound's Sentimental Verse

Extra's Song
Help me not fend
or fetch this clock!
I'll fix it to the wall!

Just stand, defend,
with wretched Glock,
the aviator's call!

Dust heap, forfend,
nor watch that flock
march goose step down the hall!

All youth, befriend,
Each door unlock,
watch goslings, eager all!

Now, that's a strong call to action in the tradition of fascist farce-force songs!

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Friday, May 22, 2020

A Little Foolishness

Fooled
Full full of himself
felt old Extra Pound;
Of that could one quite
well expound, profound,
for full of himself
felt old Extra Pound.

I cannot fathom whence some rhymes have come, but who cares?

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Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Give or Take Eternity: Re-Visited

I left something out of this poem, so here the poem is again, very slightly altered:
Our Eternal Wages
If the wages of sin is truly death,
God owes to us each one a final breath-
taking moment that he might then recall
the nefesh of life he gave to us all,
the psyche of soul, a foretaste of spirit,
the pneuma of life, the ruach within it.

It now truly says a lot: Saint Paul's glorification of the resurrected body in a nutshell!

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Monday, May 18, 2020

Give or Take Eternity: Getting Paid

Our Eternal Wages
If the wages of sin is truly death,
God owes to us each one a final breath-
taking moment that he might then recall
the nefesh of life he gave to us all,
the psyche of soul, a foretaste of spirit,
the pneuma of life, the abundance within it.

And that says a lot: Saint Paul's glorification of the resurrected body in a nutshell!

Update: See next blog entry.

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Friday, May 15, 2020

More Non-Limericks

Ship's Hold
Our Extra Pound
has grown quite old,
and yet's renowned
as good as gold,
but should be bound
by four walls cold.

We don't want to forget the ceiling or the floor, of course:
Ship's Hold
Our Extra Pound
has grown quite old,
and yet's renowned
as good as gold,
but should be bound
by four walls cold.
Two more redound
and all's a-told.

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Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Not a Limerick

Extra Pound

was up on down,
soon on late,
to on fro,

and more or less straight.

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Saturday, May 09, 2020

Serpentine Old Man

The Serpent?
Silent slithered snakelike the old man from his tree,
and coiled his scaley legs below one scaley knee,
where there lurked a knotty knotty naughty problem,
not that the man were lost of thought or fallen dumb,
but that this knot awaits: the Alexander "Key."

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Saturday, May 02, 2020

Memories are Short, but so is Time

Timely Memories
Once had a good time by all,
but whether by autumn or fall,
or springtime or lent,
some calendric event,
I do not recall now at all.

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Friday, May 01, 2020

"Ruby, Don't Don't Take Your Love to Town"

The great Mel Tillis wrote the lyrics to this song, and several performing artists have tried their hand at it, but seems to me that Kenny Rogers has given us the definitive cover.

I'm not entirely sure of the lyrics below, for there's some slippage in the 'verbiage,' but I've put together a plausible version:
Ruby, Don't Don't Take Your Love to Town 
You've painted up your lips and rolled and curled your tinted hair.
Ruby, are you contemplating going out somewhere?
The shadows on the wall tell me the sun is going down.
Oh Ruby, don't take your love to town.

It wasn't me who started that old crazy Asian war,
But I was proud to go and do my patriotic chore.
And yes, it's true that I am not the man I used to be.
Oh Ruby, I still need some company.

It's hard to love a man whose legs are bent and paralyzed,
And the wants and the needs of a woman your age, Ruby, I realize,
But it won't be long, I've heard them say, until I'm not around.
Oh Ruby, don't take your love to town.

She's leaving now 'cause I just heard the slamming of the door,
The way I know I've heard it slam one hundred times before,
And if I could walk,* I'd get my gun and put her in the ground.
Oh Ruby, don't take your love to town.
A great song. One little flaw, though. When the man said, "And if I could walk, I'd get my gun and put her in the ground," I thought, "Well, if you could walk, you'd be able to meet Ruby's needs, and you wouldn't need to put her in the ground, 'cause she wouldn't be taking her love to town."

But I've heard some versions that say "If I could move,* I'd get my gun and put her in the ground." That might resolve the logical conundrum. Maybe my friend Bill Vallicella could drop in and clear things up.

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